The Barrier

If you would like to listen just tap on the link below.

https://anchor.fm/alexandra-mars1/episodes/The-Barrier-e116dkh

Every so often, I’m asked why am I different from others who have dyslexia comes to learning, writing, and reading. They encountered a person with dyslexia who doesn’t want to read or learn because that person refuses. So, why am I different, and why?

First, we need answer this question:

Why do dyslexics believe they can’t learn?

Simple. People believe the lie that they can’t learn. Like me and others were taught from a curriculum and educators who don’t understand dyslexia or didn’t have the tools to teach their dyslexic students. (The good news it is changing, and our society is understanding.)

The lie comes from harmful labels that happened in the classroom because I experienced it. My earliest days attending school were my teachers telling me I was slow and keeping the class behind because I hadn’t grasped the new material’s concept. I felt worthless, dumb, and hopeless, and school was a terrifying place to go.

As I became older, my teachers told me to stop being lazy and do the work. A few of my teachers told me to stop acting dumb and follow the instructions on the assignment. I had a troublesome time when I got older about following directions and figuring out how to complete the homework, and due to dyslexia and Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD).

So basically, I would work on a project with six steps. I followed one through three of the steps to get the correct answer. When I came to step four, I would get confused, give the wrong answer, and do five and six right.

Since step 4 was incorrect would give me a whole different answer that was wrong. And making the matter worse was I could not discover which step I did incorrectly, for my mind told me it was correct. It always the middle step was incorrect because I couldn’t see my mistake. That made my teachers infuriating, creating a traumatizing experience in learning.

Frustrating!

I know I am intelligent because I could grasp the ideas of the concepts. However, when I need to show proof by completing the assignments, it told a different story.

There was an invisible barrier blocking the knowledge I knew about the concepts I was learning.

When I wrote my answers on paper, it was garbled and gibberish. However, when I spoke to my teacher about what I learned, it came out perfectly. Then my teacher would say, write what you just said; I had no clue how to write it. That is the barrier, and I continue to fight with it today.

Why am I different? Simple, my mother.

Parents don’t realize the influence and power they have over their children. Children need a safe place and a parent who understands their struggles. I was one of the fortunate ones, for my mother understood what I was dealing with.

Her belief in me planted a seed within me, and it took me a long time to discover my mother’s gift. My mother was supportive and told me that I was intelligent, and she understood I was doing my best. My seed of confidence turned into a sprout continued growing as it faced many storms. Without my mother’s gift, I would not have the confidence that keeps me moving towards my goals and the ability to keep moving.

Photos provided by Pixabay.

Sunday Talk with Alexandra Mars

https://anchor.fm/alexandra-mars1/episodes/Sunday-Talk-with-Alexdandra-Mars-e103up5

I am starting a new series for my podcast; where I will sit down, talking about things that are going on in my life and other topics. In today’s podcast, I discussed my goals for May and what is happening in my life. I hope you will check it out.

April 16, 2021

Last week was a busy week. I hardly didn’t do any writing at all. Because I was taking care of household chores that I was behind on and getting my space ready for my new desk chair. I ordered it online, and they delivered it to my home early last week. Then I was waiting for my friend to put it together over the weekend.

The arrival of my new chair disrupted my schedule; my back was feeling better, and I worked on overdue chores and organized my space. That made me think about clutter and Attention Deficit Disorder.

I have Attention Deficit Disorder; it is difficult for me to get rid of unwanted items. It seems my mind isn’t wired to stay organized, but I can train my mind and learn to stick with a pattern of behavior.

I have developed a philosophy has helped me get rid of things I no longer need. Perhaps my philosophy can help people with ADD struggling with items they no longer need or want. It can overwhelm for someone like me with ADD to face those decisions about my belongings.

My first tip is my philosophy that I use; I tell myself by donating my unwanted item to charity to allow someone else the opportunity to have new items. I’m providing a need to others who want my things.

My second tip: I’ve discovered dealing with unwanted belongings I no longer need is already deciding ahead of time about a particular item.

For example, my old office chair, since buying a new chair, I no longer needed it. I had designated my old chair would be a donation. My friend asked me about it and said that he knew someone who could use it. I gave the chair to my friend. I had already decided earlier about the chair, and it was easy for me to let it go.

Deciding in advance about unwanted items provides me with less stress and anxiety, preventing me from being overwhelmed.

My third tip: when I clean and get my space in order, I listen to the experts to find a place for my belongings that I want to keep.

It provides my mind the ability to think about putting my items back once I’m finished using them, and it brings me peace by keeping my space clean and clutter-free.

My fourth tip: I allow myself enough time to complete my cleaning and be realistic about what I can get done in that amount of time.

That is my philosophy. If you have ADD and struggle with clutter, you’re not alone; for some of us, it is problematic to stay organized. By creating your philosophy and changing your behavior pattern, you can live an organized life and be clutter-free. If you quit your routine, just began where you left off.

Remember, never give up.